Terraces-Nor-Yauyos-Cocha-PERU_F.-Zapata

Restoring wetlands, peatlands and grasslands in the central Andes

Ancestral Technologies and Climate Change in the Andes

The project „Restoring wetlands, peatlands and grasslands in the central Andes“ by The Mountain Institute won the 2017 Solution Search “Farming for Biodiversity” Contest in the category of “Water Impact.” It combined modern science with traditional knowledge to restore wetlands, peatlands and grasslands of the puna ecosystems in the central Andes.

Project Description

„Our project combined modern science with traditional knowledge to restore wetlands, peatlands and grasslands of the puna ecosystems in the central Andes. Mountain communities needed to make their local source of water more secure as climate change and other factors threatened to dry and degrade high mountain grasslands and wetlands. We partnered with the families of Canchayllo and Miraflores (Nor Yauyos Cochas Landscape Reserve) to repair and restore reservoirs, irrigation canals and other water regulating systems originally built by their ancestors as far back as 1,000 AD. Reviving their ancestral technologies has improved the availability of local water and has increased livestock productivity. This, in turn, has lead to greater food security and economic benefits. The richness and abundance of biodiversity has also improved in the surrounding ecosystem, helping to make the puna, and all who rely on it, more resilient to climate change. Based on the success of this project, we are replicating it in the Ancash region of Peru and in other mountain sites.“ http://mountain.org/ancestral-technologies-climate-change/

 

About The Mountain Institute

„For 47 years, The Mountain Institute has focused exclusively on the challenges faced by remote mountain communities and the fragile environments that surround them. In fact, we are the only international, non-governmental organization with this focus. We design solutions in partnership with local mountain communities to meet their unique needs. We’re making a real difference in people’s lives in some of the most remote and threatened places on the planet. Our Medicinal and Aromatic Plants project helps impoverished high-mountain farmers in Nepal support their families. In the Andes of Peru we work closely with remote communities to help them become more resilient in the face of climate change using nature-based (EbA) solutions.  And in the American West, our Institute supports indigenous peoples’ efforts to preserve their tribal lands and heritage. Our global initiatives rely on an alliance of partners who work together to keep mountain issues on the international agenda.“ http://mountain.org/what-we-do